PAPER TITLE :SEASONAL WAVE CLIMATE ON THE NIGER DELTA SHORELINE: TEMPORAL VARIABILITY AND IMPLICATION

JOURNAL OF EARTH AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH | VOLUME 1 NUMBER 1 2018

Paper Details

  • Author(s) : 1 1 1 * Dada O. A., R. B. Adesina., and Agbaje A. O.
  • Abstract:

The shoreline is an interface between land and water where continuous changes occur at diverse spatial and
temporal scales. Thus, seasonal shoreline changes constitute an important aspect of temporal variability of
the coastal environment. In this study, we investigated seasonal wind and wave climate and their implications
on the Niger Delta (ND) shoreline in the Gulf of Guinea of the North Atlantic. We extracted shorelines for a
period of 6 years (2008-2013) from remote sensing data and coupled them with wind and wave data for the
same period. The results showed that shoreline advance coincides with low-energetic conditions which
characterized winter months (wet/rainy season), while accentuated shoreline retreat coincides with highenergetic
conditions which characterized summer months (dry season). The studied winds (up to 5 m/s in
winter, but can reach up to 10 m/s in summer) and waves (wave period and wave height up to 12 s, and <1.9 m
in winter, respectively, but can be >12 s and up to 3.2 m in summer) follow the same patterns, as they are
characterized by calm and low-energetic conditions in winter months and high-energy conditions in summer
months. The same as offshore winds that blow primarily and predominantly towards the coast in the NNE
direction from the SSW quadrant, waves also approach the coast primarily from the SW, irrespective of the
season. Shoreline variations strongly correlate with the wind speed (R2 = 0.903), and the significant wave
height (R2 = 0.962), which strongly suggest that seasonal forces of wind and waves influence shoreline
dynamics of the study area. However, other environmental factors not mentioned in the study may also
contribute to these changes.

JOURNAL OF EARTH AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH