PAPER TITLE :MONOGAMY AND POLYANDRY: THEIR ROLES IN NEONATAL SURVIVAL AND THE INCLUSIVE FITNESS OF THE MALE AND F

JOURNAL Of SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY | VOLUME 3 NUMBER 2 2012

Paper Details

  • Author(s) : ARO, S.O., AYENI, A.O. and OMOTOSO, O.B.
  • Abstract:

Sexual selection theory postulates that males will compete with one another to inseminate the largest number of females possible. The ability of the male to be a successful polygynist allows him to pass on his genetic information to a large number of progeny. Thus, it is difficult to explain males who do not seek out more than one partner per breeding season, males who stay with a single partner for a long period of time (monogamy), and males who share a single female with several other males (polyandry). The mate-guarding hypothesis maintains that monogamy may be adaptive. A female left by one male would acquire another partner, whose sperm would then fertilize her eggs. Thus, it is in the best interest of the first male to remain with his partner if receptive females are scarce. Behavioural ecology is currently undergoing a paradigm shift, with the traditional concepts of the choosy, monogamous female and the coadapted gene complex increasingly giving way to the realization that sexual reproduction engenders conflicts, promotes polyandry, and thereby provides females with a cryptic arsenal of postcopulatory processes with which to safeguard their investment in large, costly eggs. This paper therefore revealed findings of researches about the roles of monogamy and polyandry in neonatal survival and the inclusive fitness of the male and female parents.